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Prince William and Kate Middleton visit Manchester
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Prince William and Kate Middleton visit Manchester

Prince William joked 'I'm not ginger' after being mistaken for Prince Harry this afternoon.

The Duke of Cambridge was leaving a conference on cyber bullying after a joint engagement with his wife Kate when he made the quip to a member of the gathered crowd.

A man shouted 'Hi Prince Harry,' just before he climbed into the car that whisked him away yesterday afternoon.

Earlier in the day, proud dad Will revealed Prince George starred in his school nativity play - as a sheep.

The youngster got dressed up with fellow pupils to wow parents and teachers at £17,600 a year Thomas', in Battersea, while the Duke of Cambridge watched on.

George's modest role shows he is not getting preferential treatment as pals took the best parts in the production.

William said: 'I went to my boy's nativity play. It was funny. He was a sheep.'

The Duke made his comments to kids from Friars Primary School, in Salford, Manchester, as they gave the BBC feedback on its shows as part of the Children's Global Media Summit, at Manchester Central Convention Centre.

William also made the keynote speech at the event, confessing how troubled he feels by cyber bullying.

He said: 'Bullying through phones and social media is an issue that caught my attention after reading about children who had taken their own lives when the pressure got too much.

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The Duke and Duchess are in Manchester for the Children's Global Media Summit and the parents-to-be looked in excellent spirits during the visit, with Kate dressing up in festive red 

The Duke and Duchess are in Manchester for the Children's Global Media Summit and the parents-to-be looked in excellent spirits during the visit, with Kate dressing up in festive red 

The Duchess looked festive in a simple but cheerful red dress from Goat Pregnant Kate is set to welcome her third child in April

The Duchess looked festive in a simple but cheerful red dress from Goat, which skimmed over her pregnancy curves  

The Duchess of Cambridge looked animated as she chatted to school children during a 'Stepping Out' session at the BBC 

The Duchess of Cambridge looked animated as she chatted to school children during a 'Stepping Out' session at the BBC 

The Duke of Cambridge learned more about children's views on mental health issues during a 'Stepping Out' session 

The Duke of Cambridge learned more about children's views on mental health issues during a 'Stepping Out' session 

The Duke of Cambridge pauses to chat to youngsters as Postman Pat and Iggle Piggle look on 

The Duke of Cambridge pauses to chat to youngsters as Postman Pat and Iggle Piggle look on 

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge listens to a question and answer session before speaking to school children

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge listens to a question and answer session before speaking to school children

Kate looked animated as she smiled while listening to a question and answer session with young people 

Kate looked animated as she smiled while listening to a question and answer session with young people 

'As a HEMS and Air Ambulance pilot, I was called to the scenes of suicides and I witnessed the devastation and despair it brought about. And I felt a responsibility to do something about it.'

The Duke and Duchess were played a video in which children were asked to read a number of comments made to bullying victims.

Among the shocking remarks were 'you're annoying', 'you're worthless' and 'Kill yourself'.

William said: 'Parents like Catherine and me are raising the first generation of digitally-immersed children – and this gives us many reasons to be optimistic about the impact of technology on childhood.' But he added: 'I am afraid to say that, as a parent, I believe we have grounds for concern.'

Kate dazzled in a red Goat Fashion dress and monochrome LK Bennett coat as she chatted to BBC Radio 5 Live's Nicky Campbell and McFly's Tom Fletcher about children's emotions.

They joined a round table discussion about 'kindness' a strategy aimed at introducing children to empathy while they are still young.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrive at the Stepping Out Session, Media City, Manchecher

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrive at the Stepping Out Session, Media City, Manchecher

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The Duchess of Cambridge looked to be getting into the festive spirit in a cheerful red dress by Goat as she visited Media City in Manchester 

The Duchess of Cambridge looked to be getting into the festive spirit in a cheerful red dress by Goat as she visited Media City in Manchester 

Pregnant Kate looked fresh-faced and glowing, after attending The Queen's Diplomatic Reception last night  At one point she placed a protective hand on her bump as she made her way into the event

Pregnant Kate looked fresh-faced and glowing, after attending The Queen's Diplomatic Reception last night. At one point she placed a protective hand on her bump as she made her way into the event 

The Duke and Duchess met schoolchildren as well as some favourite TV characters during a walkabout 

The Duke and Duchess met schoolchildren as well as some favourite TV characters during a walkabout 

Radiant royal: Kate, who is expecting her third child in April, showed off the famed pregnancy glow during the visit The Duchess hasn't sacrificed her sense of style, looking chic in a simple but vibrant red dress by Goat

Radiant royal: Kate, who is expecting her third child in April, showed off the famed pregnancy glow during the visit. The Duchess hasn't sacrificed her sense of style, looking chic in a simple but vibrant red dress by Goat 

The Duchess listened intently as schoolchildren spoke about their experiences during a Stepping Out session 

The Duchess listened intently as schoolchildren spoke about their experiences during a Stepping Out session 

The Duchess asked: 'At what stage can you start having these conversations?'

As they entered the building, the Duke and Duchess were greeted by school children as well as adults dressed in cartoon character outfits, including Postman Pat and Peppa Pig.

Alex Okosi, executive vice president and managing director of Viacom Africa, said he spoke to the Duke about the work the company was doing to help young people without access to education.

He said: 'He understood the importance of education and trying to bridge that gap between those with unlimited access and those who will never get it. He was a really cool guy.'

The couple began today's visit by attending a 'stepping out' session - a focus group for children to give feedback on new programmes to children's TV producers and editorial staff.

They met BBC director general Tony Hall, chief adviser of BBC Sport Neil Land and the director of BBC Children's Alice Webb as they arrived at the offices.

Peppa Pig meets royalty! The Duchess looked cheerful as she greeted local school children at the Global Media Summit in Manchester 

Peppa Pig meets royalty! The Duchess looked cheerful as she greeted local school children at the Global Media Summit in Manchester 

Familiar faces! The Duchess is no doubt well versed in children's TV characters as a mother of two young children 

Familiar faces! The Duchess is no doubt well versed in children's TV characters as a mother of two young children 

Working the crowds: Kate was on flying form as she paused to chat to young wellwishers 

Working the crowds: Kate was on flying form as she paused to chat to young wellwishers 

The royal couple then joined children from Friars Primary School in Salford who had watched a film created by 14-year-old Josh Gale for Newsround about developing obsessive compulsive disorder.

In a question and answer session with the children, Josh explained he had told his father about his mental health problems.

He said: 'It was metaphorically and physically like a weight off my shoulders. I was wanting to tell someone but I thought no-one would understand.'

William told the children: 'You're much better than the adults at questions. Very good questions.'

The Duchess opted for an L.K. Bennett coat and it may have been inspired by someone in the family circle Donna Air, who is dating Kate's brother James, was spotted in the same £495 coat a few weeks ago in Belgravia 

The Duchess opted for an L.K. Bennett coat and it may have been inspired by someone in the family circle. Donna Air, who is dating Kate's brother James, was spotted in the same £495 coat a few weeks ago in Belgravia (right)

Kate takes part in a feedback session with young children from The Friars Primary School, who speak about mental health and how it affects them to help inform TV programming

Kate takes part in a feedback session with young children from The Friars Primary School, who speak about mental health and how it affects them to help inform TV programming

William placed a protective arm on his wife's back as they arrived at the event in Manchester, which looks at the impact of digital media on children 

William placed a protective arm on his wife's back as they arrived at the event in Manchester, which looks at the impact of digital media on children 

The Duchess looked elegant in a checked grey coat on a chilly and grey morning in Manchester It turned out pregnant Kate had opted for a much more cheerful colour underneath her winter garb

The Duchess looked elegant in a checked grey coat on a chilly and grey morning in Manchester. It turned out pregnant Kate had opted for a much more cheerful colour underneath her winter garb 

The Duchess shakes hands with a young wellwisher as she arrives at the Children's Global Media Summit

The Duchess shakes hands with a young wellwisher as she arrives at the Children's Global Media Summit

The couple joined children for group discussions where they both encouraged the youngsters to talk about mental health.

Kate said: 'People are so worried about what they say, they aren't saying anything at all, and what we've found from speaking to people is it's so good to have conversations.'

William said: 'Mental health used to be this scary word that people didn't like talking about and it's slowly getting better now.'

Pregnant mother-of-two Kate arrived for today's engagement wrapped up against the cold in a a £495 check coat by L.K. Bennett, recently spotted on Donna Air, the girlfriend of her brother James. 

She's in the second trimester with her third child and the Duchess certainly looks glowing after overcoming the severe morning sickness she suffered at the start of her pregnancy

She's in the second trimester with her third child and the Duchess certainly looks glowing after overcoming the severe morning sickness she suffered at the start of her pregnancy

The Duchess leaving BBC Studio's at Media City UK, Manchester After arriving bundled up in a grey coat, she revealed a very cheerful red dress underneath

The Duchess leaving BBC Studio's at Media City UK, Manchester. After arriving bundled up in a grey coat, she revealed a very cheerful red dress underneath 

But once inside, she removed her outerwear to reveal a more cheerful number in bright red by Goat, one of the brands she's been relying on heavily of late.  

The event brings together creatives, technology innovators, policymakers and executives from around the world to discuss the future of media for the younger generation and explore the impact digital technology will have on children's futures.

Kate will join a forum hosted by Sesame Street's Workshop, the charitable foundation of the children's TV show, on research commissioned into kindness.

William is due attend a short private meeting related to the Royal Foundation Cyber Bullying Taskforce before giving his speech.

Last month, William gave a speech at the launch of the taskforce at Google's London headquarters and said he hoped the UK could become a world leader on tackling cyberbullying.

The pregnant mother-of-two looked in great spirits as she greeted young wellwishers in Manchester 

The pregnant mother-of-two looked in great spirits as she greeted young wellwishers in Manchester 

The Duchess was wrapped up warm against the winter chill, teaming her outfit with block heeled court shoes and thick black tights

The Duchess was wrapped up warm against the winter chill, teaming her outfit with block heeled court shoes and thick black tights

The Duke & Duchess take part in a Q&A with a young person - Josh, who featured in a Newsround special telling his story of his mental health challenges

The Duke & Duchess take part in a Q&A with a young person - Josh, who featured in a Newsround special telling his story of his mental health challenges

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrive at the Stepping Out Session at Media City in Manchester

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrive at the Stepping Out Session at Media City in Manchester

The couple made their first stop at the BBC Children’s department to learn more about interactive workshops called “Stepping Out” sessions.

The couple made their first stop at the BBC Children's department to learn more about interactive workshops called 'Stepping Out' sessions.

Last night the Duke and Duchess attended The Queen's Diplomatic Reception at Buckingham Palace with Kate opting for the Cambridge Lover's Knot tiara, which was a favourite with Princess Diana 

Last night the Duke and Duchess attended The Queen's Diplomatic Reception at Buckingham Palace with Kate opting for the Cambridge Lover's Knot tiara, which was a favourite with Princess Diana 

Before going to the summit, the Duke and Duchess will speak to schoolchildren taking part in a focus group, called a 'stepping out' session, where they can give editorial staff and content producers from children's television their views on new programmes.

It's been a busy week so far for the couple who last night attended a glittering reception at Buckingham Palace.  

The white tie Diplomatic Reception is the main social event of the year in London for the diplomatic community and reflects the Queen's importance in terms of the UK's international relations.

For the occasion the Duchess wore the Cambridge Lover's Knot tiara a piece beloved by William's late mother, Diana, Princess of Wales 

The pregnant mother-of-two appeared to be wearing a white silk gown which featured inticate embellishment around the neckline off-set by an elegant diamond necklace.

William's keynote speech at the Children's Global Media Summit, Manchester 

Good afternoon and thank you for having myself and Catherine here.

First of all, a word if I might about this great city of Manchester – to which most of you are visitors. You may have seen, if you have had a chance to go outside, the symbol of the bee everywhere in the city – the bee is Manchester's symbol, a reminder of this city's industriousness and creativity.

It is also a reminder of Manchester's community spirit, the sense of pulling together. Manchester has had a tough year, and I personally stand in awe of the way that the people of Manchester have united in bravery and support of one another. This community is a great example to all of us, wherever we are from. I hope you all have a chance to witness some of this remarkable place for yourselves while you are here for the Summit.

So, the Children's Summit. We are all here today because we know that childhood matters.

The years of protection and education that childhood provides are the foundation for our society. The programme makers and tech leaders in this room understand that.

Our childhood years are the years we learn.

They are the years we develop resilience and strength.

They are the years where our capacity for empathy and connection are nurtured.

They are the years where we impart the values of tolerance and respect, family and community, to the youth that will lead our nations in the future.

Parents like Catherine and me are raising the first generation of digitally-immersed children – and this gives us many reasons to be optimistic about the impact of technology on childhood.

Barriers to information about the world are falling. The child of today can learn about far flung corners of the world with previously unimaginable ease.

Social media holds the promise for children who can feel isolated to build and maintain friendships.

Digital media is seeing today's young people develop a passion and capacity for civic involvement that is without parallel in human history.

Programme makers have access to real-time research that helps them shape engaging, educational content for children in ways that would have been unheard of in years gone by.

We should celebrate and embrace these changes.

What we cannot do, however, is pretend that the impact of digital technology is all positive or, indeed, even understood.

I am afraid to say that, as a parent, I believe we have grounds for concern.

I entered adulthood at the turn of the millennium. The generation of parents that Catherine and I are a part of had understood the world of mobile phones, the internet, email, and the like for some time. We had every reason to feel confident.

The changes we have incorporated into our own lives as adults have often felt incremental, not revolutionary.

The vast array of digital television content that many households enjoy today did not spring up overnight.

The birth of the smartphone was heralded as a landmark moment. In truth, though, we incorporated constant texting, checking of email on our devices, and 24/7 availability into our lives over the course of many years.

The centrality of the internet for education, shopping, and the organisation of domestic life has been the work of two decades.

And it is the gradual nature of this change – the slow warming of the water in the pot if you like– that I believe has led us to a moment of reckoning with the very nature of childhood in our society.

The latest Ofcom research into the media consumption habits of British children shows us just how dramatically the landscape has changed without most parents pausing to reflect on what actually is happening.

Parents who were born before the invention of the World Wide Web now have children aged 5 to 15 who spend two hours a day online.

Ten years after the introduction of the iPhone, over 80 percent of 12 to 15 year olds have a smartphone.

Most of my contemporaries graduated university before any of us had Facebook accounts – and now 74 percent of 12 to 15 year olds are on social media.

And a generation of parents for whom watching television was something that happened as a family around a single set have given a fifth of our 3 to 4 year olds their own tablets.

Now, I am no Luddite – I believe strongly in the positive power of technology; but I am afraid that I find this situation alarming.

My alarm does not come from childhood immersion in technology per se. My alarm comes from the fact that so many parents feel they are having to make up the rules as they go along.

We have put the most powerful information technology in human history into the hands of our children – yet we do not yet understand its impact on adults, let alone the very young.

And let me tell you parents are feeling the pressure. We need guidance and support to help us through some serious challenges.

Everywhere you go, mothers and fathers are asking each other the same questions.

'Did you see that so-and-so's friend had an iPhone at the playground?'

'How can I keep my daughter off social media if all of her friends are on it?'

'How do I know what my children are doing online in their bedrooms? How do I monitor what they're messaging to other children?'

'How do I find out what apps my children have downloaded?'

'How do we protect family time and teach our kids about actual connection, when all their communication is through their phone?'

'How do we convince our children to go outside and be active and fit, when all they want to do is play online?'

These conversations are happening right now in our towns and cities and right across the world. We have all let technology slowly creep into our lives. And now we are waking up to the enormity of the challenge technology and modern digital media will mean for children.

The people in this room may be the best placed in the planet to help today's parents, teachers, and caregivers to grapple with these questions. As I said earlier, you are only here because you are passionate about childhood. Your combined experience and insight can be a powerful force for positive guidance.

Parents are eager for your advice about how best to combine technology and innovation with the timeless goal of safe and innocent early years that are filled with love and genuine connection.

Like all of you, I believe firmly in the power of bringing people together, people with knowledge and passion, to tackle big issues confronting our society. That is what I did through the Royal Foundation when we established the Taskforce for the Prevention of Cyberbullying.

Bullying through phones and social media is an issue that caught my attention after reading about children who had taken their own lives when the pressure got too much.

As a HEMS and Air Ambulance pilot, I was called to the scenes of suicides and I witnessed the devastation and despair it brought about. And I felt a responsibility to do something about it.

The Royal Foundation brought together the leading players in digital and social media, the ISPs, academic researchers, and children's charities. And importantly, we brought children and parents themselves to the table, so their voices could be heard directly.

What we heard is that cyberbullying is one of those issues that had been allowed to slowly take root. An age-old problem had been gradually transformed and accelerated by technology that allowed bullies to follow their targets even after they had left the classroom or the playing field.

The technology we put into the hands of our children had for too many families shattered the sanctity and protection of the home.

After a year and half's work, the taskforce announced a plan of action last month. The sector agreed to four main areas of work:

the implementation of standard guidelines for the reporting and handling of bullying;a national advertising campaign to establish a code of conduct for the online behaviour of children;the piloting of an emotional support platform on social media;and finally the members have pledged to continue to work together to offer consistent advice to parents and more material for children to help them thrive online. And you will hear more about this next.

I am proud of what was achieved, but, as I said at the time of the plan's launch, I had hoped we could go further. I am very pleased that the BBC has taken up the challenge of supporting one area that I believe merits further discussion: the creation of a single, universal tool for children to report bullying when they see it or experience it – regardless of which platform it happens on.

What we have shown through the taskforce – and what we show when we gather on days like today – is that solutions to our challenges are possible when we work together.

We can be optimistic about the way digital media will help our children when we can be frank about our concerns.

Families can embrace technology with confidence when they can access the best the best support and advice.

And we can be hopeful about the future of our society when we all know that protecting the essence of childhood remains our collective and urgent priority.

Thank you.