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Which Sentence Is Grammatically Correct

Which sentence is grammatically correct?

The original question is:Which sentence is grammatically correct?I am married, with two kids.I am married with two kids.I am married and have two kidsWhich one is correct? why?Answer:Sentences 1 and 3 are correct. Sentence 2 is not correct because it implies that you are in a marriage relationship with two children.

Which sentence is grammatically correct?

They all sound wrong to me. Help?

Which of the following is the clearest and most grammatically correct way of rewriting the sentence?

"In fact, they had neither the freedom to decide where to watch the movie nor to choose when to see it."

a. In fact, they had not the freedom to decide where to watch the movie nor to choose when to see it.

b. In fact, they had neither the freedom to decide where to watch the movie or to choose when to see it.

c. In fact, they either had the freedom to decide where to watch the movie nor to choose when to see it.

d. In fact, they had the freedom neither to decide where to watch the movie nor to choose when to see it.

Which sentence is grammatically correct?

A) My work plan schedule states that on February, 16 2009 I will have completed the following tasks for my annual report; gathering secondary and primary data, accurately recording publication information, and matching graphics with my objectives.

B) My work plan schedule states that on February, 16 2009, I will have completed the following tasks for my annual report, gathering secondary and primary data, accurately recording publication information, and matching graphics with my objectives.

C) My work plan schedule states that on February 16, 2009, I will have completed the following tasks for my annual report: gathering secondary and primary data, accurately recording publication information, and matching graphics with my objectives.

Which of these sentences are grammatically correct, and why?

#1 is correct, the way you've written it.
You are describing a "kind of person", not just yourself, so you use the third person pronoun.
If you are just talking about yourself, you could simply say "I need dead silence while I do my homework."

Which one of these sentences is grammatically correct?

The first sentence is right.I would like to make a point about the usage of the word 'who'. Since 'duo' is a word for a group of people, it is not in itself a human being, and will be treated like a non-human noun. You must use 'that' in place of 'who'. Now about whether it should be treated as singular or plural. The fact is that like all collective nouns, 'duo' can take the singular or plural form depending on whether the action being performed by the duo is done collectively or not.E.g. The duo lives in Melbourne.The duo live apart in different cities.In the example you quoted, since both members of the duo are living and working in the same city, the right sentence is:We're an Australian duo that lives and works in Melbourne. ORWe're an Australian duo that is living and working in Melbourne.Clearly, sentence 1 from among the options you mentioned is a contraction of this last sentence, and therefore the better option.

Which one of these sentences is grammatically correct?

Yes. Keep the “a”. It’s not the “products” that the “a” is referring to. It’s the “affordable price”; and that’s singular.“The products” and “a much more affordable price” are two separate objects. Notice the “the” in front of “products”. That’s a clue that you don’t need any additional directives, modifiers or articles to address the object “products”. “affordable price” however, is singular and has no article; therefore it should be given the “a”.If you were to pluralize “price” and make it “prices”, you wouldn’t need any article at all.“Buy the products at much more affordable prices.”When an object is singular it typically requires an article. When the object is plural it typically doesn’t.“When I was in college I sold a computer.”“When I was in college I sold computers.”“I enjoy a drink every now and then.”“I enjoy drinks every now and then.”“I went on Quora today and answered a question.”“I went on Quora today and answered questions.”

What makes a grammatically correct sentence?

A grammatically correct sentence is one that has clarity and holds to convention unless it makes example of breaking it.Sometimes grammar is obeyed to demonstrate how new terminology breaks down in the final analysis or how old terminology was originally expressed ingrammatically to incur change in dealing with it.One is free in writing to ellicit fresh literary devices to invite wider perspective or dispell cliche'd notions . Business before pleasure is acorruption of the wish, " May your business be for your pleasure as well""God bless you" sounds like a command of a wizard who may soon sneeze, but " May God bless you" identifies the idea of hope which is comfort to know another holds.

Which sentence is grammatically correct: “When did you came” or “When did you come”?

“ When did you come? ” is grammatically correct.This is because of the reason that second form of verb is used with did.The first and the third form of verb come are same,i.e.,First form (V1): ComeSecond form (V2): CameThird form (V3): ComeTherefore, with auxiliary verbs like has/have/had the third form,i.e., come is used.Eg. 1. She has come to the station to catch the train to Dehra.2. I have come to see my sister.3. They had come to ask for help.