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Do I Have The Potential To Become A Concert Pianist

How do you become a concert pianist?

How you do it: talent, hard work, practice, practice and more practice.
The benefits: great music, artistic satisfaction, money

Could I become a concert pianist?

I thought about becoming a concert pianist when I was your age.. then I had a chance to spend some time WITH a Concert Pianist and he gave me a HUGE Dose of reality.

To begin with.. 3 hours a day is LAUGHABLE.. a concert pianist will practice 10 to 12 HOURS A DAY 24/7/365 and, before they do a concert, that will be more like 16 to 18 HOURS A DAY.

Once I had a chance to learn what would be involved and expected if I continued on to be a concert pianist.. I decided to just go commercial and make a whole lot more money than I EVER COULD as a concert punist and would be playing much more besides.

Be careful what you ask for... you may be unlucky enough to GET IT.

How do you become a concert pianist?

Practice and study.Get accepted into a few of the major summer music festivals. You can meet a lot of people there.Win or place well in a major international competition or two (you’ll find this is rather difficult). An agent and contracts for touring and recording will soon follow of their own accord.The few people I personally know who are full-time, true-blue, world-touring concert pianists would, I think, all agree that their job is not something they chose so much as it chose them. One thing that they all have in common is that they probably couldn’t do a single other job on earth if their lives depended on it—not because they’re incapable people, since they’re complete geniuses, but because that is the level of devotion and singularity of purpose they’ve brought to the craft for their whole lives.It’s a crowded, competitive, and brutal circuit out there. Your love for music and your industriousness and growth in pursuing it will make you a better musician and a better human being, in all likelihood. It’s possible to succeed—maybe not always in just the way we intend, but definitely possible.The grind only crushes those who aren’t strong enough to permit themselves to walk away when they need to. My advice: always approach the music respectfully in great earnest, but never take yourself too seriously.

Can I become a concert pianist?

Sure, why not?I would suggest building technique, especially with the Chopin etudes. As already said, passion for the music is VERY important.Chopin etudes are some of the most important pieces you will ever learn during your journey to pianistic fame. They are both incredibly difficult and a pain in the arse to learn, but you’ll be reaping rewards for years to come.Essentially, if you don’t know what they are, the Chopin etudes are a set of 24 pieces(written in two different opuses: 10 and 25) written to take basic skills: arpeggios, scales, etc. to the highest possible level.Take op. 10 number 4 for an example: the infamous Torrent Etude. It’s known as possibly the most technically difficult Chopin etude, and for good reason: listen to the absolute control necessary to play the piece, even at a slow tempo.I had to learn Torrent measure by godforsaken measure. It was a painful process, but learning these etudes is the best way to progress as quickly as possible: seeing as you’re seventeen, now is a good place to start as any.Good starting etudes…I would say Revolutionary or opus 10 number 2 are some good options, as well as Winter Wind: they all require incredible finger dexterity, yet are fairly easy to learn and play slowly(also, the ones that I started with).I wish you the best of luck in your journey. Sorry about my little spiel about the Chopin etudes, I’m really passionate about them.Wait, one more thing: the “wrong note” etude, or opus 25 number 5, is also a great starting etude(though definitely harder than the Revolutionary, in my opinion).Hope this helps!-hicco

What does it take to become a concert pianist?

I have a friend who started playing piano at 17 as well, practiced,3-5 (qualitative, consistent practice always trumps quantitative, brute, unfocused practice) hours a day, and is just now a concert pianist at a fairly large church and is a piano accompanist at two community colleges. He's 24. And he didn't have any music experience before playing the piano either. I know many will disagree, but "Natural Talent" doesn't have much to do with your potential as a musician. Being able to ride a bike, do calculus, driving a car, and making music is not a trait that we biologically inherit. Now do some people have natural aptitudes, and upbringings that that makes individuals inclined at certain activities? of course. And some jobs require that you be physically gifted in some areas...for example being exceptionally tall in order to play professional basketball. Certain aspects of yourself, you cannot control. But as a long, you have ten working fingers, no major mental disabilities, and continual desire and passion to learn and create music, there's nothing stopping you from being able to play at the level of a concert pianist. Of course, there's a lot more variables to being a professional musician than just your sheer ability- there will always be thousands of other musicians that will be equally as capable as you. This is when the people you know, your personality, and a fancy resume matters. So perhaps, you may never become a concert pianist for these reasons. Which is not a testament to your overall worth as a musician. Perhaps what you really should ask at this point is "at some point, can I be as a concert pianist?" to which my answer once again is: yes, absolutely.

What does it take to become a concert pianist?

I also have a pal who all started taking part in piano at 17 besides, practiced,3-5 (qualitative, consistent prepare constantly trumps quantitative, brute, unfocused prepare) hours an afternoon, and is in simple terms now a stay overall performance pianist at a somewhat huge church and is a piano accompanist at 2 community faculties. he's 24. And he did no longer have any music journey earlier taking part in the piano the two. i understand many will disagree, yet "organic skills" would not have plenty to do including your skill as a musician. being waiting to holiday a bike, do calculus, utilising a automobile, and making music isn't a trait that we biologically inherit. Now carry out a little people have organic aptitudes, and upbringings that that makes persons prone at particular events? of direction. and a few jobs require which you be bodily gifted in some factors...as an example being fantastically tall with a view to play expert basketball. particular factors of your self, you could no longer administration. yet as an prolonged, you have ten working arms, no substantial psychological disabilities, and persistent want and keenness to study and create music, there's no longer something combating you from being waiting to play on the point of a stay overall performance pianist. of direction, there is plenty extra variables to being a expert musician than in simple terms your sheer capacity- there'll constantly be thousands of different musicians which would be the two as in a position as you. it is while the individuals you already know, your character, and a complex resume concerns. So perhaps, you may by no skill strengthen right into a stay overall performance pianist for those reasons. which isn't a testomony to your conventional well worth as a musician. perhaps what you extremely could ask at this factor is "in some unspecified time interior the destiny, can i be as a stay overall performance pianist?" to which my answer as quickly as back is: definite, actual.

What does it take become a concert pianist?

As a rule, someone who is going to make it as a concert pianist is already winning competitions playing much harder music at 16 so you have your work cut out for you. You may be technically adept, but out of a hundred pianists who can play difficult pieces technically perfectly only one or two will make it as concert artists because you need both perfect technique and exquisite musicianship. How's your musical expressiveness? It needs to be far above average. Or do you mean professional pianist rather than concert soloist? You could probably do that. There are pianists who make a living playing as rehearsal accompanists at theaters or for choirs, playing background music in restaurants and so on. That's a much more realistic goal to aim for, and it's what the technically perfect but musically just above average pianists usually do.

Can I become a concert pianist?

I have a friend who started playing piano at 17 as well, practiced,3-5 (qualitative, consistent practice always trumps quantitative, brute, unfocused practice) hours a day, and is just now a concert pianist at a fairly large church and is a piano accompanist at two community colleges. He's 24. And he didn't have any music experience before playing the piano either. I know many will disagree, but "Natural Talent" doesn't have much to do with your potential as a musician. Being able to ride a bike, do calculus, driving a car, and making music is not a trait that we biologically inherit. Now do some people have natural aptitudes, and upbringings that that makes individuals inclined at certain activities? of course. And some jobs require that you be physically gifted in some areas...for example being exceptionally tall in order to play professional basketball. Certain aspects of yourself, you cannot control. But as a long, you have ten working fingers, no major mental disabilities, and continual desire and passion to learn and create music, there's nothing stopping you from being able to play at the level of a concert pianist. Of course, there's a lot more variables to being a professional musician than just your sheer ability- there will always be thousands of other musicians that will be equally as capable as you. This is when the people you know, your personality, and a fancy resume matters. So perhaps, you may never become a concert pianist for these reasons. Which is not a testament to your overall worth as a musician. Perhaps what you really should ask at this point is "at some point, can I be as a concert pianist?" to which my answer once again is: yes, absolutely.

Can I become a concert pianist in my thirties?

First, let me say how wonderful it is that you want to be so generous with your talents. Your community is lucky to have someone so forthcoming. Since you lack a promoter, you may need to engineer your own performance engagements, and there is nothing wrong with that. Next, I would offer a few ideas: 1) From the other music teachers in your bailiwick, identify the younger instrumentalists preparing for recitals. They will need accompanists. Payment is customary in many locales, but nothing stops you from contributing your services gratis. And, if it is a full recital program, it would be entirely appropriate to have your own major piano piece on the same program. There you are, performing a piano feature on a program promoted by someone else, and playing to an audience probably new to you. 2) Set up a series of Sunday afternoon programs. Charge nothing, if the church venue opens its doors for free. Newspapers typically give free ink for such things. The hosting church will certainly give it prominent exposure in service bulletins preceding the event. And, if you include the church's choir for three numbers on the program, you will have an assured audience. Keep the program under an hour, keep it reasonably light, have tea/coffee/cookies following, and you'll have people coming back for the full series. 3) Check out the public access channels in your community. Mine are always hungry for program material. Also, there are always aspiring camera operators and program producers happy to handle the production details. A nice benefit of TV appearances is you get to attend your own concerts. If the first one goes well, make it a series with different themes for each monthly show. 4) Put together a school program. Keep it under 45 minutes. Include mostly shorter, mostly lighter pieces. Intersperse some reasonably entertaining educational chatter. Leave some time for Q & A. Have at least one teenie pop piece. And take your program from school to school. You'll play more gigs if you waive compensation, but expecting pay is not unreasonable. Offer a package to nearby school systems whereby you take the program to several of the schools in the same system. Good luck with your career.