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If A Metal Door Uses Floor Hinge Do You Need Door Closer

Need handyman help- doors not closing?

The stopper is not causing the problem. The house has settled and the door is no longer "plumb".

With the door closed, look at the space around the door. It will be wider at the top or the bottom. Open the door and remove the screws from the hinge where the space is widest-- if there is more space at the top, remove the top hinge. Get a piece of thin cardboard/posterboard (like you might find in the wrapping of a new shirt). Use the hinge as a template to cut pieces of cardboard matching the left and right sides of the hinge. Put 2 of the pieces under each half of the hinge and re-attach the hinge to the door and door jam. Now do the same with the middle hinge, using 1 piece of cardboard under each half of the hinge. Re-attach the middle hinge. Now when you close the door you will see that the space around the door is more even than it was, and the latch will have moved slightly up or down, depending on whether you adjusted the top or bottom hinge. Make additional adjustments as needed.

If the space around the door is even and the latch still doesn't line up, remove the strike plate. Fill the screw holes with wood filler (and allow time to harden). Also fill part of the hole for the latch -- the bottom part if you need the strike plate moved higher, the top part if you are going to move the strike plate down.

Hold the strike plate over the door where it needs to be and trace around it with a pencil. Use a chisel to enlarge the place where the strike plate is to be seated-- up or down as needed. Also enlarge the hole where you want the latch to go (above or below where you added wood filler).

Now holding the latch in the new position, drill new screw holes. Reattach the strike plate.

Door know hole + hinges??? Is this too hard for me?

If you have not already bought a door slab, you can order one that is prepped (machined, holes bored, hinge areas chiseled out) from a real lumberyard, or a store that sells doors and windows in your area. Loodjobs, above, is pretty much right, but you have to know a few more things if you are going to order a door already prepared:

Assuming that we are talking about an interior door,
a: The exact width of the door (if you don't have the old door to measure from, measure the width of the opening and deduct 1/2")
b: The exact height of the door (if you don't have the old door to measure from, measure from the top of the opening to the floor and deduct 3/4")
c: The thickness of the door (probably 1-3/8")
d: The distance from the top of the door to the top of the first hinge, and to the top of the middle hinge, and to the top of the bottom hinge.
e: What height are the hinges (probably 3-1/2")?
f: Do the hinges have square corners or rounded (radius) corners?
g: If they are rounded, is it just a little (1/4" radius) or quite a bit (5/8" radius)?
h: The distance from the top of the door to the center of the knob hole (if you don't have the old door to measure from, measure from the top of the door opening to the center of the latch hole and deduct 1/4")
i: The diameter of the knob hole (almost assuredly 2-1/8")
j: The "backset": the distance from the edge of the door to the center of the knob hole (again, almost assuredly 2-3/8")
k: The "edge bore": the hole that goes through the edge of the door for the door bolt (almost assuredly 7/8")
l: The "handing" of the door: which way does it swing? (if you are pushing on the door to open it, if the hinges are on the left, it is a left hand door; if they are on the right, it is a right hand door)

You sound as if you could handle the job of machining the door yourself; you have gotten the right information. But, by the time you buy the chisel, bits, tools, etc. and take your time, it won't be that much more expensive to buy the door prepped - probably cost an extra $50-70 to have this done. Find an old fashioned lumber yard (I hope there is still one near you!)

One of the doors in my house is suddenly hard to close. How can this be? The door frame has moved?

First of all, one would think humidity. However, it is most unlikely that the phenomenon would continue for days.
Second, there is the HINGE problem...
Depending on the type of hinge that you have, there can be 2 types of issues. If the hinge is fixed, that is the "flaps" of the hinge are either screwed to the dood edge and to the door frame, then the screws are loose, probably at the uppermost hinge.
If the screws can not be tightened (possibly someone used the door as a "cradle" to rock from one side to the other - my boy used to do that when he was about 5 or 6), then dismantle the screws and insert some wood splinters and adhesive in the old hole (try pieces of matches). Then retighten the screw and lift the door a little bit placing some wood or plastic shims under it at the "doorknob side". Leave it closed till the adhesive tightens.
There is also the possibility that you have an "adjustable hinge". These are attached to the door in a special hole, where a metal bar welded to the hinge itself enters. Usually there is also a blocking screw, which as a rule is on the "door frame side". Try to see if it is loose...
Third, and last, also you should check the closing mechanism area... It may be that one of the screws holding it in place is loose and it is protruding a bit at each close...
At any rate... check the HINGE first! It does look like a loose hinge problem to me. Good luck!

Does a bored out doors have hinges on it, or only prehung doors?

I am kinda confused, I have read other post's that ask similiar questions but I still need to ask my own. I want to replace my interior doors, I am not sure what the difference is between a molded bored slab or a prehung door. I know the prehung has the frame, but does the bored out slab come with the hinges notched out? I really don't want to change out the door frames, this is a old house and the frames are metal with the hinges built in behind the frame. I guess I can try to notch out the slab type if neccessary myself if I watch a video and get the right tools. I guess I want to know if I can by the bored out slab and just cut them and pop them on the old hinges? Thanks.

Is there a hinge that locks into the 90 degree position?

The type of hinge you are looking for is often called a 'table', or 'shelf' hinge. You might also consider a 'table leg' hinge.

You didn't specify size requirement, or limitation, so here are a few for your consideration.

This is a link to several 'table', 'table leg' and 'shelf' hinges -
http://www.hardwaresource.com/Store_View...

And this link is to one Ive used in making very heavy duty restaurant style tables -
http://www.instawares.com/table-hinge-fo...

"Drop leaf" hinges are often 'just' the hinge, and the support mechanism is seperate. The support can be either a slide out style, or hinged mechanism, but it is almost always seperate from the drop leaf hinge itself. These hinges and supports can be found at most wood working suppliers like Rockler, and Woodworkers Supply.
http://www.rockler.com/search_results.cf...


Have Fun

How do you remove the pin from a door hinge?

First, apply a few drops of a penetrating oil such as Liquid Wrench to the stubborn pin. It is much more effective than WD-40. Let is soak for a few minutes, then tap the pin with the hammer head. This will break the rust and allow the LW to penetrate further. Many hinges have an open bottom where you can insert a nail and tap the pin upwards. Check and see if that works. Don't ruin a Philips head screwdriver - use a nail first. If the hinge is not open at the bottom, then I recommend using a cold chisel (rather than a flat blade screwdriver) tapped in the gap between the head of the pin and the body of the hinge plate. If the LW broke the rust, the pin will slide up as you tap the chisel. Angle the chisel head against the pin head and tap it free. You might be able to use a pliers to fully grasp the pin and remove it. After you are finished, and intend to reinstall the hinges, clean off any rust with clean steel wool and WD-40 or a light oil such as 3-in-One oil to prevent future rusting. Work on the bottom hinge first so the door doesn't fall off the jamb. When that is finished, remove the upper hinge with a helper holding the door.

Door Hinge Screws Sizing?

The # designation refers to the diameter of the screw, not the length.

A # 6 is often referred to as a 'trim' screw, because of its smaller size.

Most pre-hung door hinges come with # 8 flathead screws, and can come in anything from 3/4" long to 4" long. (Typically, to go any longer, you would want to increase the diameter, so as to not risk snapping the screw off under torque.. like a # 10, or # 12)

Most prehung doors, are secured to the jambs with #8 x 3/4" length screws, and the center screw will usually be 3 1/2" long, so it can tie into the framing stud, to help secure the door assembly.

If your door opening is so far back that a 3 1/2" inch screw cannot hit the framing stud - you should probably consider adding a stud to help fill the gap, and give your shims something to brace against. Having a large gap behind the hinges will result in a weak door assembly, and I believe you will find it difficult to keep it plumb and square, over time.

Good Luck

Stuck hinge pins! How do I remove the door?

If you have a large nail punch , that will do the trick.

If you don't have a nail punch, you can make one out of a large nail. by using a hack saw to cut off the point of the large nail. -- a skinny nail will bend, use a large nail to make a nail punch.

edit: Do not unscrew the hinges (except as last resort) . If you do, it will weaken the screw holes, and you will need to repair the holes (make them tight again) by cramming a tooth pick in each hole.

If the hinge pins are stuck due to rust, then WD 40 will help. But if the hinge pins are stuck due to paint build-up -- WD 40 will just make a mess as it runs down your door.

If paint caused the problem, you might use a liquid paint remover, if you have some handy.

If it is paint build-up, you might also rap the hinge very slightly and very carefully to break the paint loose ----- but if you warp your hinges by hitting on them or whatever -- it will be hell to pay --

The nail punch is the best idea if you can swing it or make one.

Is there a hinge that locks into the 90 degree position?

The type of hinge you are looking for is often called a 'table', or 'shelf' hinge. You might also consider a 'table leg' hinge.

You didn't specify size requirement, or limitation, so here are a few for your consideration.

This is a link to several 'table', 'table leg' and 'shelf' hinges -
http://www.hardwaresource.com/Store_View...

And this link is to one Ive used in making very heavy duty restaurant style tables -
http://www.instawares.com/table-hinge-fo...

"Drop leaf" hinges are often 'just' the hinge, and the support mechanism is seperate. The support can be either a slide out style, or hinged mechanism, but it is almost always seperate from the drop leaf hinge itself. These hinges and supports can be found at most wood working suppliers like Rockler, and Woodworkers Supply.
http://www.rockler.com/search_results.cf...


Have Fun

Have you ever acquired something very cheaply, and later found out it was extremely valuable?

I bought an oil painting in a pawn store for either $110 or $120.Below is an image of the actual painting, and wooden hand carved picture frame, that I purchased.It’s titled, “Portrait of Beatrice Cenci.”The original was done by Guido Reni around the year 1600.This one is a fine reproduction that was done “in his school” around 1685 to 1695, according to the appraiser and the University Art department when I had it dated and an appraisal done on the piece.It’s not super expensive, it’s just in excellent condition, and I liked the piece from the instant that I saw it. I knew it was a not the original. It was so perfect, I thought it was a much more recent reproduction, maybe 100 years old or so. I was way off.The pawn store was one of my own stores. The painting had the seller’s family history stapled on old aged note paper dangling from the hanging wire on back of the painting. The seller was not interested in the artwork, or his family history. He said he was the last of his family and he didn’t need, or want, any of the items that he had inherited. This is the only thing he sold me.I hoped that it was worth much more than the money he wanted for it, but I wanted to own the piece regardless of its value. I told him that he wasn’t leaving my store with this painting, and that I was going to own it.I believe that he asked to sell it for $100, if I recall. I told him that I felt it was worth more. Then he either said give him $110 or $120, for it… and I did. It seemed that we were both very comfortable with the deal we had made.Sadly, the old wooden frame has now started to crumble due to age. I’ve removed the painting so it won’t get damaged.I’ll have the wooden frame restored, hopefully within a few months, so we can hang it and enjoy the artwork again… as soon as I can find someone truly qualified to restore a 323 year old frame. That should cost me around $1,000 or so.I have no plans to sell the art piece. I imagine that my wife and I, or someone in our family, will donate this artwork to a small museum at some point.In the mean time, it’s been a very enjoyable, extremely affordable, art-purchase.Oh, in 2011, the painting had an appraisal value of $25,000.