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Is There A Better Way To Word This

What is a better way to word my topic sentence?

Claim: Social Media should stop negatively influencing children

Topic Sentence of supporting paragraph: Children are naïve; as a result, social media has a hug role in influencing bad morals in children.

Is there a way to reword my topic sentence?

Is there a better way to word this sentence more formally:"Completing a Bachelor’s degree has been a goal of mine for years and due to personal circumstances I haven’t been able to work towards it until now"?

"Completing a Bachelor’s degree has been a goal of mine for years. Due to personal circumstances, until now, I haven’t been able to work towards it.”Let me explain my preferred arrangement.It is best that you split the statement into two: 1) It will allow your listener or reader to take a breath, and2) It will lay down the thought that you will talk about.Completing a Bachelor’s degree has been a goal of mine for years.Due to personal circumstances, until now, I haven’t been able to work towards it.Placing the until now before I haven’t been able to work towards it gives it more weight or emphasis.Try to listen to the difference if until now is placed at the end. It sounds limp.

What is a better way to word the phrase "All of a sudden"?

Just then,
Without warning,
Suddenly,
Unexpectedly,
Surprisingly,
With great surprise,
Unbelievably,
It came to be quite suddenly,
It happened so suddenly and quickly,
Shockingly,
Stunningly,
Like a flash of lightening, so quickly did it happen.

Should it be "way better" or "much better"?

Much better is grammatically correct and always acceptable in any context. He’s feeling much better today.Far better is also a good option. This hotel is far better than the one we stayed in last year.Way better isn’t wrong, but it can sound less formal in some situations. The best way to use this phrase is when you want to suggest that a person has come a long way toward a goal or desired outcome. She sings way better now that she’s had lessons. (She has come a long way in her progress toward being a good singer)

Is there a better way to word this sentence? "Compassion is the ability to understand someone else’s emotions, which results in the desire to reduce their suffering or sadness."

Is there a better way I can reword this sentence: “Compassion is the ability to understand someone else’s emotions, which results in the desire to reduce their suffering or sadness.”?I would prefer to say: “Compassion, the concern for the feelings of others, may instill in us the desire to reduce people’s suffering or sadness.”

Is there a better way to say "Every other day".?

I am applying for a job and want to say I attend physical training sessions every other day. Is there a more professional way to say "every other day"? I was thinking Bi-daily or Semi-Daily but can't find those words defined anywhere and I'm not even sure they are real words. Please don't answer if you don't know. Thanks.

Is there a better way to word the sentence "In realizing Bobs' suffering, Joe grasps a new understanding of what it means to be compassionate”?

Your use of an apostrophe - in the wrong position , Bob is a singular - you turn the word “suffering “ into a gerund. I dont think that this conveys your intended meaning ,ie that knowing about Bob’s pain has thus increased Joe’s understanding.If I have inferred your purpose correctly, I would choose a structure that makes “suffering” a present participle, and clearly implies thatJoe is affected by some direct observation of what is now HAPPENING to Bob.Like this: “In realizing that Bob is suffering, Joe grasps a new understanding of what it means to be compassionate “Be careful with the uses of the final ‘s’ in written English. It can imply possession, or plurality, or both : good luck.

Is there a better way to say black guy?

Instead you can say, an African-American or just a ‘guy’unless mentioning his race is significant in that situation.If somebody asks you whom you came with. You dont have the say “ That black guy over there”. Instead you can say “ The guy over there holding the beer”.On the other hand, if you saw a crime and tell the police, “I saw a nigga” or “I saw a man of Negroid race”, it would be either racist or too technical, which would be the two extremes you can avoid.“I saw a black guy breaking in the store” would have a tinge of racism and stereotyping involved. Instead you can say “I saw a man breaking in. He was tall, of good built and black”. This would give race less importance in the situation and mentioning it only serves the Police to find the guy.

Resume Help. I need a better way to word these skills --?

Um,

"Stress enhanced" is Dilbert-quality jargon. It would make me laugh, which is probably not quite what you want. Substitute "fast-paced" or even "busy".

Every server in the world should be able to manage multiple tables. Just say, "I have multi-tasking and organizational skills developed by attending to multiple customers' needs".

Finally, I would say, "I have exceptional customer service and communication skills." You might add that you deal with conflict effectively and productively, that you are flexible (I'll be you do things outside the "server" job description all the time), and that you have a high energy level and commitment to making each customer's experience exceptional.

Okay, I get Dilbert-ian also. There are just lines you don't cross, and stress enhanced is one of them. Also, "commendatory" is not a word. "Commendable" is a word. Good luck!

Better way to word "Never forget your roots" for a tattoo?

I wanna get a tattoo that says something to the affect of "Never forget your roots" or "dont forget your roots" but I want to word it better, make it sound pretty ya know, it seems like its sort of an awkward statement. I'm gonna get it in pretty handwriting/cursive on my side. Can anyone think of anything?