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Is This A Good Price For These 3 Items

If you had to buy 3 items for $10, $1000 and $10,000 to best represent your lifestyle-- what would you purchase?

$10 would buy me some good beer.$1000 would get me an awesome VR set, something that I have been thinking of buying for years and I think represents the future of personal entertainment.The $10000 is the most tempting, and would most probably go into funding a new university degree or learning a new skillset which would make myself a bit richer and more knowledgeable in the long term. I'm very big on investing in myself, that is somehow my lifestyle, and ultimately being maybe the boring sort of person that I am — I value the experience gained while earning knowledge more than any material possession or vacation that I can take, and $10000 is not really a big investment that I would be able to enjoy in the long run.For better or for worst, that is who I am — beer, technology, and a safe player who wants to bet on himself for his own future.Sorry to disappoint, Fook Fook. You know me, I'm no party boy :P

When a shop keeper sold 2/3 of an item, he got the cost price of the whole lot. What is the percentage of his?

1/3 or 33% 2/3 plus 1/3 equals

[Percentages] How do you solve these word problems?

1. Tai used a coupon and bought a sweater for $32. The full retail price wa $40. What percent did Tai save with her coupon?

I got 80%. The answer in the book says 20%. How did they get that answer?

2. A store allows customers to buy 3 items of the same price and get 2 more of the same items free. What percent savings does this represent?

I couldn't even come up with an answer. The book says 40%. How exactly do you solve that question? @_@

Thanks in advance!

Jerry has a coupon for $3 off the price of an item. If p represents the original price of a shirt, which expre?

Jerry has a coupon for $3 off the price of an item. If p represents the original price of a shirt, which expression tells Jerry's cost, before tax, when he uses the coupon?

p divided by 3

3 - p


p - 3

p + 3

How to calculate the original price after the discount?

How do you calculate the original price of an item after you were given the discounted price? For example, I bought 3 item clothes and they were on 20% discount. I ended up paying $89 after the discount. How can I calculate the original price of these items without the 20% discount?

I was able to answer this, however, I used trial and error until I finally got the correct answer. Is there an equation on how to solve this without doing a Trial and Error method?

A cashier multiplied the prices of 3 items instead of adding them and the total bill was of 90.09 and by adding them the total was still the same. What are the prices of the items?

The prices should be 77, 13, and .09I used trial and error to find out the answer. If there is a way to find out other than trial and error, kindly let me know.

What are the 3 items located within the trunk (the gold globe) at the top of the flag pole at Military bases?

razor, a match, and a .45 bullet

List and explain 3 factors that determine the price elasticity of demand for a good or a service?

There are a number of factors that can determine the price elasticity of demand for a good or service.

For example, the demand for luxury items tend to be more elastic than the demand for necessities. For items that are essential, you tend to be less responsive to changes in price. An example of this would be the demand for diamonds tends to be more price elastic than the demand for electricity.

Price elasticity of demand is also affected how large a percentage of your total income an item is. We tend to be more elastic in regards to price changes for items that make up a larger percentage of our incomes. For example, if the price of a pack of gum goes up by 10%, I probably wouldn't even notice. On the other hand, if the price of a car I'm considering purchasing goes up by 10%, I would definitely notice and I would probably reconsider the purchase.

A third factor that influences the price elasticity of demand is the time frame allowed for response. We tend to be more responsive to changes in price in the long run than in the short run. For example, if the price of gas were to go up overnight to $10/gallon I would still have to put gas in my car tomorrow morning because I have to go to work and I have to go to school. But if the price of gas were to stay at $10/gallon for a year, then I have more options. I could move closer to work, start carpooling, or trade in my car for a hybrid with better gas mileage so that I don't have to buy as much gas. So in the long run, demand tends to be more elastic than in the short run.

Hope this helps.