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Present Tense And -ing Diffferences For Example

What is the difference between present simple and present tense?

Hey.A tense is the time frame you are talking (or writing) in. There are three basic tenses (or time frames) in English:past (yesterday)present (today)future (tomorrow)Each of these three time frames can contain different modes that communicate different ideas. Sticking to the present tense, for example, you can have:“simple” mode: John eats breakfast here every day. (usually used to indicate activity that is a custom or habit, something we do regularly)continuous mode: John is eating breakfast here. (usually used to indicate activity that is happening in the moment of speech, that is, right now)perfect mode: John has eaten breakfast here since 1978. (usually used to indicate activity that began some time in the past and continues to occur, generally, in the present)So, the difference between the “simple” present and the present tense is:the “simple” present is a mode usually used to indicate a habitual activity or something that is generally accepted as true all of the timethe present tense is a time frame that can include several different modes, including the “simple present” and generally represents the present time, for example right now, or today.

What is difference between simple present tense and present indefinite tense? This is a book, falls in which category?

There is no difference between simple present tense and present indefinite. In this current education system people updated the Present Indefinite tense name with Simple Present tense.When something is happening right now that is called simple present tense.‘This is a book’ is an example of simple present tense, here ‘is’ is not an auxiliary verb it’s working as main verb.

What are differences between past tense and present tense?

Hey.A tense in English is a time frame. There are three tenses in English experience:past (yesterday)present (today)future (tomorrow)We tend to group our general experience in each of these three time frames. It’s not a hard rule, but it helps us organize our life. Like a date book.The page that represents today is the present tense.The page that represents yesterday is past tense.The page that represents tomorrow is future tense.Of course, on each of those pages we can note a number of activities that take place at different moments during the day.Sometimes something noted yesterday is still true today, maybe even tomorrow.In English, to cover all of those different subtleties in overlapping time zones, we use different modes:“simple”continousperfectThese are the three most used modes, all of which can be used in any of the three tenses.All complicated explanations aside, the difference between the past and present tense is a question of the time frame you are talking about.From the moment you are speaking, throughout the speaking, your present living moment will probably be in the present tense, expressed in one of the three modes I’ve mentioned above.From the moment you are speaking and referring to any moment before this moment, you’ll probably use the past tense in one of those modes.Look at your watch.The time it is right now is the present. That’s the smallest present we usually deal with.Any moment before that moment is the past.Different cultures look at time in different ways, but generally, we all share yesterday, today and tomorrow, and that’s the basis of tense.

What is the difference between simple past tense and present perfect tense?

The reason why many people are confused between the usage of these two tenses is mainly because both these tenses talk about events that have already been completed.Now, here are the clear differences between the usage of these two tenses :Present Perfect Tense is used to describe events which have already been completed, in the past or recently ( which also is a past in the real sense), but which have a direct connection with, or impact on, the present time or place. In Present Perfect Tense, we don´t mention the specific time of happening or completion of the particular event.In contrast, in the Simple Past Tense, we talk about events which have already been completed but which may or may not have any direct connection with, or impact on, the present time or place. Here we have to specifically mention the time of happening or completion of the particular event.E.g. 1. I have taken my breakfast. - This is in Present Perfect Tense. The action of taking breakfast has already been completed but it has a connection with the present time, upto the lunch time. After Lunchtime, you can´t use this form of the sentence, because lunch breaks the connection between the breakfast and the present time. In that case, you can only say …2. … I took breakfast at 8 am today. - This is in Simple Past Tense, describing an action which has already been completed and which has lost the connection with the present time, because the lunch has disrupted the connection between the breakfast and the present time. The specific time of its happening, 8 am, has also been mentioned, to satisfy the requirement of this tense.Another example :The Manager has gone out . - This is in Present Perfect Tense. This sentence implies that the Manager is likely to come back, because this tense implies that the action still has a connection with the present time/place.In contrasrt,2. The Manager went out at 11 am. - This is in Simple Past Tense. This sentence implies that the Manager is NOT likely to come back to the office the same day, because this tense implies that the action has NO MORE connection with the present place. Hope this explanation helps.

Whats the difference between present simple and present Indefinite?

The Present Indefinite Tense is the tense that denotes the habit-showing actions that are not clearly defined or stated. For example: -

1. Dogs bark at night.
2. We see with our eyes.
3. We hear with our ears.
4. A cow gives us milk.

Clarification: All the sentences [1,2,3,4] show that dogs, we, and cow are not necessarily presently active at work as define; but they all have the habit of barking, seeing, hearing, and giving to the state respectively.

When it comes to tenses, like past, present and future:
The simple present or present simple is one of the two present tenses used in modern English, the other being Present continuous.

Present continous tense is more commonly used than present indefinite tense.

What is the difference between past participle and present tense?

Are you asking for past participle or past perfect? If it is past participle then it is not a tense. It is only a form of verb which can be used 1)As a verb in perfect tense. Examples “I have done it” “He has gone home” “I had done it before he went home” 2)As a verb in passive voice Examples “It was done by me” “It has been done by me” 3)As an adjective Examples “A broken chair, spoken English etc”. Present tense is something that says about present. There are present simple, present continuous, present perfect and present perfect continuous. There is no comparison between present tense and past participle. Sorry!

What is the difference between present tense and present perfect tense?

Hey.The present tense (aka: “simple” present) in English is used to speak about two main ideas:Things that are “true”Things that are custom or habitFor example:The sun rises in the east. (This is a truth.)I read for an hour every evening. (This is a habit.)Many people plant gardens in the spring. (This is a custom.)The present perfect reflects a larger time frame, beginning in a moment in the past and continuing to have an impact on the present moment of speaking.For example:I have worked here for three years. (I began working here three years ago and I continue to work here as I speak.)She has lived in Spain since 1986. (She moved to Spain in 1986 and continues to reside there as I say the sentence.)The “simple” present is often accompanied by frequency adverbs that indicate, as they are named, the “frequency” of the custom or habit:I always go to bed at eleven.He sometimes takes the train to work.When the “simple” present is used to express a truth, there is little need for any additional adverbs.The auxiliary used for the “simple” present is “do”.This auxiliary is usually omitted in affirmative sentences, though it can be used for emphasis. The main verb form is the root for I / you / we / they, and the root + -s (with some spelling peculiarities!) for he / she / it — except when the auxiliary “do” is present!I see little green men in the garden. (simple affirmative sentence)I do see little green men in the garden! (emphatic affirmation)She turns green every morning. (simple affirmative sentence)She does turn green every morning. (emphatic affirmation, main verb form is root)The auxiliary “do” can not be ommitted from questions and negative sentences in the “simple” present.I don’t understand you.Do you believe in aliens?The auxiliary for the present perfect is “have” and the main verb is in the past participle form.This auxiliary can not be omitted in any of the three sentence types: affirmative, negative or question. It is obligatory:They have seen that movie before.We haven’t been to Spain yet.Have they arrived already?You’ll notice those two words, “yet” and “already”, which are also often used in the present perfect.

What is the difference between "send" and "sent"?

Send and sent represent different tenses - the time something happens- of the verb  to send. As you are aware actions are represented by verbs,which  are called doing words. So, send is used  to form the present tense,for example, I send her an email every day;to form the future tense : I will send her an email tomorrow;to form the subunctive mood: I do not know if I will send him an email . -this can be at any time.Sent is used for the past tense: I sent her an email yesterday; and for the perfect tense: I have sent her an email- to mean something has been completed: and the pluperfect tense : I had sent her an email - sometime in the distant past.

What is the difference between the present perfect and the present perfect subjunctive in spanish?

The PRESENT PERFECT tense is frequently used for past actions that continue into the present, or continue to affect the present.
The PRESENT PERFECT SUBJUNCTIVE is used when a verb or expression requiring the subjunctive in the main clause is in the present, future, or present perfect. (You might notice that the same definition holds true for the present subjunctive, but the difference is that the present subjunctive is used when the dependent clause is in the present or future, while the present perfect subjunctive is used when the dependent clause is in the past. For example, if you want to say "I doubt you'll do it," you'd use the present subjunctive: "Dudo que lo hagas." But if you wanted to say "I doubt that you did it," you'd use the present perfect subjunctive: "Dudo que lo hayas hecho").

The PRESENT PERFECT SUBJUNCTIVE is a compound verb formed with the subjunctive of the auxiliary verb "haber" + the past participle of the main verb.
For example: "It's good that he studied" - "Es bueno que haya estudiado."
The PRESENT PERFECT is also compound, but it's formed with the present of "haber" + the past participle.
Example: "He studied." - "El ha estudiado."

So the difference lies not only in the mood, but in the time of action. The present perfect is just a compound past tense, and the present perfect subjunctive is used when the dependent clause (usually starting by a "que...") is in the past. Also, notice that you'll only use the present perfect subjunctive in a dependent clause, simply because that's how all subjunctive tenses work.
I hope this helped.

What is the difference between present and present perfect?

The present perfect refers to an act that took place in the past, from the perspective of the present. "I have eaten" means that at some point in the past, eating occurred. Now (at the present), it is over. The simple present tells you about what's going on currently. "I eat" means that the act of eating is ongoing. (Though it can also refer to a habitual act; I may not be eating right at this instant, but it's the sort of thing that I could be doing right now, because the eating isn't complete.)In general, the tense of the sentence tells you what time the sentence is pointing to, and the perfect aspect tells you that the act was done before that. So the past perfect "By six o'clock, I had eaten" means that at some point in the past (6:00), some eating event had already been completed (before 6). It's the past perfect because "had" is in the past. "I have eaten" is present perfect because "have" is present. It's "perfect" because the act is over.