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What Is The Job Of The Law

How do I find a job at a law firm?

Your mom or other people at the firm must have connections with other firms in the area. Your best option is going to be to use the network you already have. Otherwise keep looking at the classifieds, etc. You can also mail unsolicited resumes to firms you're interested in, but this usually doesn't work too well unless you have a connection on the inside at a place that's actually looking. As it sounds like you don't have an associates or bachelors degree, jobs without some sort of connection are going to be extremely difficult to come by. The receptionists/runners at the firms I've worked for all have bachelors degrees.

Law and Order SVU, NCIS, jobs..?

I'm a 14 year old girl, and lately i've been thinking a lot about what i would like to do with my life. One thing that i have recently found myself interested in is shows like Law and order, law and order SVU, and NCIS. I have been thinking about what it would be like to have a job like any of the characters in those shows, and i have a few questions.

1) are any of these shows close to how things are in reality or is it all really over dramatic like ive heard?

2) what are the advantages and disadvantages for the different jobs? (im interested in Tony, McGee, and Ziva's jobs as well as Abby's job from NCIS and i like the job that the girl from SVU has, but i can not remember her name)

3) how long do you have to go to college for these jobs?

4) what are the average salary's for these types of jobs?

Thanks!

An arbitration attorney can either represent clients or act as the presiding authority in a proceeding known as arbitration. These proceedings are out-of-court meetings where disputing parties can present their case and make arguments. The decision of the presiding authority, who does not necessarily need to be an attorney, is typically binding on all parties.

Is making law the job of parliament?

If you are talking about the UK parliament, then not really. The Government usually makes (i.e. writes/prepares/drafts) the law and Parliament then has the opportunity, through a series of stages, to amend and pass or not pass the draft into law. So Parliament amends and ratifies draft laws into law, but government actually drafts it.

Polish Law Degree = What type of job in USA?

Hello dear, I would try to answer your question as accurately as I can.First of all,let me tell you that I am also from Eastern Europe,hence I deem I have the vantage point to observe the opportunities in front of you and your husband more clearly. Please, do not take it as a hindrance that he has a Polish Master's Degree.Bear in mind that in USA they have a clear view regarding to the stable education we obtain in Europe (that is valid also for our so called post-communist countries) and our consistency ,vast knowledge,etc. Maybe at the beginning would be a little tougher for your husband to adapt, according to my information he might have take some exams(not in all of the states that is required),then he could start in quite many fields of the legislature system.Usually, there are always some "gaps" in the system where he can begin as a start.(depends on his drive,the Law consists of many branches). If he's too young he may find as a good chance to work as an assistant in Court for example.Thus he'll aquire more knowledge and will expand his view on how to proceed with his career.Trust me,I have a shining example of the so discussed American dream in my family,the trick is to keep on and not to hesitate too much! I would love to help you somehow,but frankly,it's mostly a question of your personal decision.Wish you luck from the bottom of my heart.Best of luck!

There’s the slightly glib (but still absolutely correct) answer: the associate’s job is to make their boss look good. This applies all the way up the chain: the partner’s job is to make the person at the company who hired them look good. Etc.But more explicitly, an associate’s job is often dictated by economics. Whether right or wrong, most big firms bill their lawyers out at a rate that’s proportional to their experience. Most of the time the billing rate is set by law school graduation date, at least for the first 7–10 years out of school.Thus, junior associates are very cheap, but they are also very inexperienced and can’t do anything on their own. So, they do a lot of the time-consuming grunt work on a matter, but almost always under the supervision of someone more senior.For example, in big litigation, junior associates are the ones who are reviewing discovery productions, redacting documents for privilege, researching points of law, and writing internal memos to tell higher-ups what they need to know. Maybe they’re drafting sections of briefs or motions. Maybe they’re riding along shotgun at court hearings and depositions, but not getting in the ring.Mid-level associates (say, 3–5 years out of school) hit that “sweet spot” where they know enough to work somewhat independently, but still don’t cost too much. In some practices, mid-level associates really get the most interesting work. They might be arguing relatively low-stakes motions or taking/defending depositions, directing experts, writing first drafts of memos/motions, etc.You’ll notice, BTW, that the typical BigLaw salary scale reflects this. Don’t look at salaries, but look at year-over-year salary differentials. You’ll find the biggest growth in years 3–6. When bonuses are announced, it will be the same story. Firms recognize that mid-year associates are often the most profitable, so retention is a top priority in this demographic.Once you age out of the mid-level associate band, then you start to take on more supervisory roles. Sure, you still do “your own” work, but it’s usually for higher profile clients of the firm or on higher profile matters with bigger budgets.Then (if all goes well), you make partner. At that point you… well, don’t get me started. Fortunately, that’s beyond the scope of this question. :)

What is the Highest Rank/Job in Law Enforcement?

As I understand it, the Sheriff's of America are the highest authority officers. The Sheriff can order or voluntarily surrender their authority to any law officer at any time anywhere and then can recover that authority at their choosing.

Example: If the Secret Service were with the President of the United States, they can take control any time and give orders/directions to the Secret Service, FBI, Federal Marshall's, DEA, NSA…… etc etc… State and Federal are under the authority of any Sheriff’s Office if the Office wishes to impose their authority.

In addition to Jordan Conley's very good list, there's also the issue of constructive termination to look out for.  If you're modifying the job of someone such that either (1) it's impossible for them to actually perform the duties described, or (2) the change in duties is the equivalent of a demotion without the due process outlined in your employment agreement, and it's being done with the intention of forcing the employee to leave the company, in many states that would be considered a constructive termination, and the employee may be entitled to unemployment insurance as well as possibly suing for other benefits denied (such as severance).

Role of contract law is to document what each party to a contract is obligated to do for the other. Contract laws also serve to assign consequences in the event either party is unable to perform the duties taken up under the terms laid out in the original contract.Contracts law is also meant to uphold the basic processes by which the economy functions in the United States and in all countries throughout the world, though not every country has a common law basis for understanding contract law.Contract law in other systems may have a heritage derived from civil law, Islamic law, socialist law, and/or from tribal law. Depending on each country's specific views of contracts, law systems in the country may assign more protection to the consumer or may afford more protection to the corporationobligated to do for the other. Contract laws also serve to assign consequences in the event either party is unable to perform the duties taken up under the terms laid out in the original contract.Contracts law is also meant to uphold the basic processes by which the economy functions in the United States and in all countries throughout the world, though not every country has a common law basis for understanding contract law.Contract law in other systems may have a heritage derived from civil law, Islamic law, socialist law, and/or from tribal law. Depending on each country's specific views of contracts, law systems in the country may assign more protection to the consumer or may afford more protection to the corporation