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What Should I Do 18 Years Old And I Stutter

What can I do to help my 2.5-year-old nephew with his stuttering, without the use of medication?

I am not aware of any medication that is used to treat stuttering. I’m cutting/pasting from Heather Jedrus's answer to My 2.5-year-old son has recently started stuttering. He was fluent since he started talking, it seems he is learning a lot and unable to speak all but still wants to. Is this a reason to worry?Many children go through periods of normal dysfluency around the ages of 2-3 years old. They are learning a lot of language at that time.Here are some of the differences between normal dysfluency and stuttering:Normal dysfluencycomes and goesdoesn't last longer than 6 monthsconsists of whole-word or phrase repetitions. "We went, we went, we went to the park!"Stutteringhas been going on for 6 months or longeroften there is a family history of stutteringmore common in boys than in girlspartial-word repetitions "W-w-w-e went to the p-p-p-park!"sound prolongations "Ssssssssee you llllater!"silent blocks, when he's trying to talk but no sound is coming outsecondary behaviors, such as rolling eyes, grimacing, stomping footYou can take your child for an evaluation with a speech-language pathologist at any time that you are concerned about his speech. If it's too early to determine whether it's normal dysfluency or stuttering, they will ask you to bring him back in 6 months or so. Ask your pediatrician to recommend a speech-language pathologist (or a facility that has many of them, such as a children's hospital) who works with young children.My son started stuttering when he was 3. Since I'm a speech-language pathologist myself, I just kept an eye on his speech for a while. It started out as whole-word repetitions, but then after a few months, he started doing partial-word repetitions. It continued for over 6 months, and he has an aunt who stutters. By the time I took him for an evaluation, I knew that he was definitely going to need speech therapy. But it's always fine to take them in for an evaluation when you're not sure. The speech pathologist will be able to tell you whether he's fine, needs to come back for another evaluation, or needs to start therapy right away.StutteringStuttering Foundation | Since 1947 - A Nonprofit Organization Helping Those Who StutterPage on mnsu.edu

What causes a 5 year old to stutter?

Did your child just begin to stutter? Did he/she stutter since 18- 24 months old? Is he/she a full word, certain sound, nonword stutterer? Does he/she stutter when singing little rhyming songs? Starting to stutter @ 5 years old is unusual. Stuttering at 18–24 months old is fairly common with a decrease in stuttering by 5 years old. Readons for stuttering are many: genetics ( there is a genetic link), breathing issues, auditory processing, emotional issues etc. Dysfluencies which is what stuttering is needs to be addressed by a trained, accredited, experienced professional: a pediatric speech therapist! The stress of what your child’s peers may impress on him/her over the stuttering as well as your child’s frustration makes it all more difficult for your child. Get help now! Talk to the teacher, go to a local rehab facility, look through the yellow book, ask your pediatrician for pediatric speech therapists. And get started. You should also get home program suggestions, too.

I am 17 years old and I just started stuttering. What could be the cause?

I have no idea the cause of your stuttering; nor do I think it would help to know. Working on a remedy might be a better option.Have stuttered all my life….and I mean SEVERE stutter. Was so severe and for so long that I surrendered that it was going to be a cross I would carry through life. It wasn’t until at the age of 29, when I went to an exceptional speech pathologist, did I find hope.He told me that I don’t really stutter. I clutter, which means I speak VERY fast. During the first session, I was told that it cannot be cured, but it can be controlled. That gave me hope! He gave to me the six rules for good speech. Which are:1) Think - about what you say before you say it.2) Breath - talk as you exhale rather than inhale.3) Move your mouth - that will prevent slurring4) Make all sounds - and be sure to emphasize the last sound of each word. ***5) Use enough voice ***6) Talk slow - in order for your speech to sound normal to the listener, it must sound abnormal to you. NOTE: Don’t worry about it seeming too slow for you…your listening will wait you out!Too, I learned years ago from Dr. Don Kirkley, who taught public speaking at the Pentagon, the key to effective speaking is hesitation. Pause. No more than six (6) words at a time without a pause. Even less…than six… will work…nicely.Oh, and a note - it’s not easy. It takes work. You CAN do it. I went to the speech therapist one hour per week for 52 weeks. My last session, he asked me to read a story about George the Rat, and if I may say, I did an excellent job. He then said, Now, I want you to listen to this. He played a recording of a kid trying to read the same story. It was obvious to me that the young man had physical problems. I could not understand what he was saying. At the end I said, My gosh! Who was that?! The therapist’s next words I will remember until the day I die. He said, That was you during your first day of therapy.My fear of public speaking was for many years more than most could possibly comprehend. Now, it’s a rush. Promise! To make a long story short, by using the rules given to me, I’ve presented workshops/seminars throughout the United States.Good luck to you and BE PATIENT. This will take work, but you can do it!There is more that I could share than this space will allow. If you are serious about overcoming your stutter, take a look at the ebook available on Amazon Kindle, Rise Above: Conquering Adversities.

I'm 15 years old. I started stuttering (stammering) from few months. Will it stop by itself?

Hi there,Actually there are two kinds of stammerings, physical stammering and mental stammering, which are as follows:Physical stammering, means and includes the mouth and tongue strives hard to spell a particular word in a sequence. Which can be easily cured, By just prompting the word, which is to be said at that time. It'll take one or more attempts to get the fluency but a little amount of practice suffices.Mental stammering, means the thought which accompanies your words will get stopped due to unexplainable reasons, i.e., when you wanted to say something your mind gets mute as your thoughts will get lost somewhere, as a result your mouth sounds something to cover your gap between your thought and your words. Which is a big problem when compared to the physical stammering. There are so many kinds of cures such as some prefer to start mugging up the paras and sentence which is to be said at that particular time, and some explain to follow someone’s diction of speech so that it'll be cured soon during a matter of time. But as a matter of fact it's a chronic problem when compared to the mere physical stammering.Good luck

Is there any treatment for stuttering in a person aged 18?

Stop stuttering all together? Probably not. Control stuttering to where it is very manageable and is no big deal? Absolutely.Have stuttered all my life….and I mean SEVERE stutter. Was so severe and for so long that I surrendered that it was going to be a cross I would carry through life. It wasn’t until at the age of 29, when I went to an exceptional speech pathologist, did I find hope.He told me that I don’t really stutter. I clutter, which means I speak VERY fast. During the first session, I was told that it cannot be cured, but it can be controlled. That gave me hope! He gave to me the six rules for good speech. Which are:1) Think - about what you say before you say it.2) Breathe - talk as you exhale rather than inhale. Try to take 1 or 2 breaths during each sentence.3) Move your mouth - that will prevent slurring4) Make all sounds - and be sure to emphasize the last sound of each word. ***5) Use enough voice ***6) Talk slow - in order for your speech to sound normal to the listener, it must sound abnormal to you.Too, I learned years ago from Dr. Don Kirkley, who taught public speaking at the Pentagon, the key to effective speaking is hesitation. Pause. No more than six (6) words at a time without a pause. Even less…than six… will work…nicely.Oh, and a note - it’s not easy. It takes work. You CAN do it. I went to the speech therapist one hour per week for 52 weeks. My last session, he asked me to read a story about George the Rat, and if I may say, I did an excellent job. He then said, Now, I want you to listen to this. He played a recording of a kid trying to read the same story. It was obvious to me that the young man had physical problems. I could not understand what he was saying. At the end I said, My gosh! Who was that?! The therapist’s next words I will remember until the day I die. He said, That was you during your first day of therapy.My fear of public speaking was for many years more than most could possibly comprehend. Now, it’s a rush. Promise! To make a long story short, by using the rules given to me, I’ve presented workshops/seminars throughout the United States.Good luck to you and BE PATIENT. This will take work, but you can do it!There is more that I could share than this space will allow. If you would like to learn more of how I overcame my stutter, read the ebook, Rise Above: Conquering Adversities on Amazon Kindle. It’s also available online in paperback format.To view click on the link below:Rise AboveAll the best to you….

2.5 yr. old fell out of his bed, hit his head and stuttered for 1 week.?

My 2 1/2 yr old boy tumbled over the guardrail on his bed, falling approx. 30in. landing smack on left side of his forehead on a hardwood floor. He almost immediately had a Hematoma ("Goose Egg") on the left side of his forehead the size of half a golfball. I am a first year Paramedic student, so I assessed him by asking his name, his brother's name, my name, and also checking pupil reaction to light, which was all OK. My wife and I put an ice pack on the injury. He settled down after 10-15 mins. and wanted to go back to bed. We kept him up another 1/2 hour, then reluctantly let him go back to sleep with my wife in the bed with him just in case. I set my alarm to wake up a few times in the night to rub him until he started to wake/show a reaction. Here's where things get confusing. Everything was fine, until 2 days later when the child started to stutter like crazy. My wife took him that day to our Pediatrician, who said it was merely a coincidence that the fall and stuttering occurred together like that, and not to make notice of it to him, he would grow out of it. My wife works in the N.I.C.U. of our local hospital, and asked the opinion of 3 other Neonatal Dr.s, who all had the same opinion as our Pediatrician. One week later, the stuttering is totally gone. Can anyone give me any insight on this matter? Could the stuttering have been a temporary effect of brain swelling that has subsided? I would hate to think that we took this issue too lightly. Could anything more have been done treatment wise for this kind of injury? This was a very stressful situation, as I am in Paramedic college, and tried to keep a cool head during the event, but this is my baby we are talking about, as I'm sure any good parent can tell you it is a terrible thing to see your child hurt. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Will I ever be freed? I'm 18 years old. I've been stuttering since the age of 5. I can't deal with that for the rest of my life. It's too much to handle. I just want to die.

I don’t want to be insensitive to your pain, I can see how mortifying it should be to stutter for you but dying is your solution? It seems a bit extreme. Of all the things that can go wrong, you did not get the worse. Let us see you could have been mute, mute and deaf, blind, paralyzed. You get the idea. There is worse, much worse than stuttering. Now you got a terrible deck of cards when it comes to resilience and that needs to improve right away. Death is inevitable, so some day you will have your wish granted and you won’t find it so fantastic. But for now, you need to work on being more resilient because life will keep on throwing you curve balls and you need to just keep on going with your life. So relax, work on being more resilient and accepting and then maybe your stuttering will improve over time.There is plenty of time for you before you die. Do the best you can with your life.

When does stuttering begin?

Your best source of help for stuttering, especially with a young child is The Stuttering Foundation of America. Check out www.stutteringhelp.org and you will find tips for parents of ways they can help, if and when your child needs to see a speech therapist who specializes in treating stuttering, a list of referrals to specialists all over the world, online videos, helpful books you can find at your library, and the causes of stuttering. They are a nonprofit group started by a man who stuttered.

Can smoking weed help with stuttering?

Im 18 years old and ive been smoking for a little over a year now. I smoke on a daily basis except for days i can't get weed. I've had a stutter all my life, and i wouldn't call it severe but just mild. It really just depends on the day how bad my stutter is. Although ive noticed when I smoke I hardly ever stutter if at all. Stuttering really sucks, and definately has a large negative impact on my life. Imagine being a guy with a lot to say and to contribute to conversations whether it be with friends, or even at school during a lecture. But not having the means to express your thoughts without stumbling and stammering through it. I just can't imagine myself with a successful career in the future without some sort of fix for my stuttering. It's really a problem for me. I feel like if i didn't stutter i would be a whole different person, a better person.