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Which Renaissance Characteristics Also Describe The Ideas Of The Protestant Reformation

What is revolutionary about the Renaissance, the Protestant reformation, and the Scientific revolution?

Renaissance, as a cultural movement, encompassed a resurgence of learning based on classical sources, the development of linear perspective in painting, and gradual but widespread educational reform. Traditionally, this intellectual transformation has resulted in the Renaissance being viewed as a bridge between the Middle Ages and the Modern era. Although the Renaissance saw revolutions in many intellectual pursuits, as well as social and political upheaval, it is perhaps best known for its artistic developments and the contributions of such polymaths as Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, who inspired the term "Renaissance man";

Protestant Reformation began as an attempt to doctrinally reform the Catholic Church, affected by Western European Catholics who opposed what they perceived as false doctrines and ecclesiastic malpractice — especially the teaching and the sale of indulgences, and simony, the selling and buying of clerical offices — that the reformers saw as evidence of the systemic corruption of the church’s hierarchy, which included the Pope;

Scientific revolution was a period when new ideas in physics, astronomy, biology, human anatomy, chemistry, and other sciences led to a rejection of doctrines that had prevailed from Ancient Greece through the Middle Ages, and laid the foundation of modern science. According to the majority of scholars, the scientific revolution began with the publication of two works that changed the course of science in 1543 and continued through the late 17th century: Nicolaus Copernicus's De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres) and Andreas Vesalius's De humani corporis fabrica (On the Fabric of the Human body). Philosopher and historian Alexandre Koyré coined the term scientific revolution in 1939 to describe this epoch.

How are the Renaissance, the reformation, and European exploration/colonization interrelated?

Before Martin Luther there was King Henry the VIII and he was a hot mess. It all started when King Henry wanted a divorce from one of his many wives but was unable to do so because back in those days everyone did as the church said. So, the King appointed a new archbishop to the church of England that would grant him a divorce, this move corrupted the church and led to the uprising of many other religious faiths. Martin, bothered by donations to religious faiths for forgiveness and the infamous building fund, burned the papal bull and began the Protestant Reformation. Because the King was able to manipulate the Catholic Church to benefit himself it opened the door for other changes and corruption within the church, false prophets. Everything became questionable in the eyes of Martin Luther.

Which Renaissance characteristics also describe the ideas of the Protestant Reformation?

Humanist theories.

Oh, crumbs, is THAT a question! My answer is going to be a long way from being perfect, so be warned:Protestantism tends to be highly individualistic, since it says that all men can have a personal relationship with God. This wound up meaning that lots of peasants and working-class people and city boys started to think that feudalism wasn’t such a great idea.Religion gave kings and princes a brand new reason to go to war against each other. They did this so much that they had to invent whole new ways of conducting warfare: instead of buying off mercenaries left and right, and calling up aristocratic levies, armies and kings actually had to (gasp!) centralise! This undercut the feudal system too.After people decided that they’d had enough of religious warfare, they decided around 1648 that although they might make life difficult for a Dissenter in their country, they weren’t going to wholesale murder them. It wasn’t worth the effort.People thinking that they could be theologically correct led to a proliferation of sectsThe argument about whether Church or State should be stronger took on a completely different formThe Scots started teaching everybody to read and write so that they could read the Bible. Later on, the Welsh and the New Englanders did the same.Politics took on more of a grassroots dimension that in some cases were actually successful (kind of). Case in point, English Civil War.I guess you could say it changed Europe like the Sixties changed America - changes of heart and mind that went in all sorts of intellectual and theological directions.

Renaissance Humanism's effects on Reformation?

The renaissance placed more emphasis on man (humanity) and less on God and the Church. This allowed the individual to think through ideas and determine the meaning of truth rather than to automatically defer to the Church and the pope in such matters. Thus a man like Luther would believe in his own rational and interpretive powers when he was confronting some of the excesses of the Church, such as the selling of indulgences.
It's interesting that Luther went on to translate the Bible into German, and he intentionally translated certain passages so as to justify his interpretation, which differed with that of the Catholic church. (In my opinion, he intentionally mistranslated.)
The Renaissance also rediscovered great thinkers of ancient Greece, such as Plato, Aristotle, the playwrights, and mathematicians. Such discoveries also encouraged new ways of thinking and tended to break minds free of the established iideas of the church. The Greeks were brilliant although they were not Christian, and the Greek civilization encouraged a diversity of thinking.
The Ren was a celebration of individuality, and to some extent, a loss of face of centralized authority. Hence you get the explosion in the arts by such different individuals as Da Vinci, Michaelangelo, Rafael, and thus you get almost as a counterweight the explosion in the NUMBER of protestant sects as a result of the protestant reformation.

Renaissance, The Enlightenment, Reformation, and Scientific Revolution connections?

The connection is that two came first: Renaissance and Reformation. Then the next two happened, Enlightenment and Scientific Revolution. They did not occur same time, some parts of Europe were slower than others.

Changes came fastest in England and Germany, slower in Spain and Italy. France was sort of inbetween.

The Renaissance and Reformation happened in Europe between 1450 and 1600 or so.
It was caused by a breakdown in control by the Catholic Church, which controlled not only Kings, but learning in important educational centers.

When anyone went against Catholic dogma, or ideas, or offended the Pope, it often meant they'd be accused of heresay, even death.

Only when people found "protectors", or supporters could they begin to think about science, and make improvements

For example, for nearly a thousand years, no paintings could be made of anything, that did not have a religious image. Painters had to honor God, with their gifts. When wealthy merchants wanted their own portraits painted, it was taking a great risk.

For a long time, the Earth was considered to be the center of the Universe. When Copernicus and others showed that it wasn't, they were accused of heresy, killed, or imprisoned, their writings banned.

Eventually, after several religious wars, and the Protestant Revolution, (Called the Reformation) THEN the Enligtenment and Scientific Revolution came about.

Still today, some churches and fundamentalists still challenge many ideas like evolution, for example, even though it's been 150 years since Darwin wrote his "Origin of the Species".

I'd suggest you start your essay from the present. Explaining how many ideas (like I suggested above) were once either unknown, or illegal to think about or teach.

Then explain key people of the Enlightenment, and Renaissance, that contributed to the Scientific Revolution.

How did the renaissance help lead to the reformation in European history?

Before Martin Luther there was King Henry the VIII and he was a hot mess. It all started when King Henry wanted a divorce from one of his many wives but was unable to do so because back in those days everyone did as the church said. So, the King appointed a new archbishop to the church of England that would grant him a divorce, this move corrupted the church and led to the uprising of many other religious faiths. Martin, bothered by donations to religious faiths for forgiveness and the infamous building fund, burned the papal bull and began the Protestant Reformation.

Because the King was able to manipulate the Catholic Church to benefit himself it opened the door for other changes and corruption within the church, false prophets. Everything became questionable in the eyes of Martin Luther.

What is the difference between reformation and renaissance?

The Renaissance comes from the Italian word rinascitá, which means "rebirth". They saw this as a Rebirth of the old Roman and Greek Civilization. The renaissance first began in the fragmented city - states of Italy. These renaissance intellectuals said that the epoch following the fall of the Roman Empire in roughly 500 A.D. until their own times was the Dark Ages - or the more politically correct term, the Middle Ages. Yet these people were kidding themselves. It is a paradox that the cultural and intellectual achievements of the renaissance owed a lot to the medieval world. There were gains in literature, art, philosophy, political, and yes, historical thought. Individualism: people wanted to receive personal credit for what they did, instead of praising God for everything.

The invention of the printing press in the mid-fifteenth century by Johannes Gutenberg (whom A&E's Biography named him the most important man of the millennium), allowed trends and education to spread through out Europe. This resulted in the Northern Renaissance. Now here comes the difference that you need to know. The Italian Renaissance is mainly interested with secular ideas. The Northern Renaissance with religious concerns that eventually lead to the Protestant Reformation.

The Renaissance is thought of as having ended in 1527 with the Sack of Rome by Charles V, HRE (Holy Roman Emperor)

Reformation, was a spiritual/religious revolution that aimed to correct the “problems” of the Catholic Church and sparked a century and a half of religious civil war. It resulted in the establishment of the Protestant branches of Christianity- e.g. Lutheranism, Calvinism etc