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What Is A Participle In English

What is a participle?

A participle is an adjective that comes from a verb. One common one is "married." That comes from the verb "marry." But used as a participle, it can function as an adjective: A married woman sold that house. You can see any adjective could replace "married." "Happy," "pretty," "smart," etc. The verb in that sentence is "sold," and the subject is "woman."

All participles are either past participles, like "married," or present participles, like "crying," for example. It comes from the verb "cry." The crying baby disturbed the church service. Baby is the subject, and disturbed is the verb. A participial adjective describes "baby."

The past participle also is part of every passive verb. We add "be" and change the verb to the past participle. Example: Active sentence--The mailman brings the mail every day.

The passive equivalent: The mail is brought by the mailman every day.
Brought is the past participle of bring.

English Verb, participle, gerund?

1.
Walking to school is enjoyable.
A. participle
B. gerund
C. verb

2.
The shark is attacking the marlin.
A. participle
B. gerund
C. verb

3.
The sharks have attacked the marlin.
A. participle
B. gerund
C. verb

4.
The students were giggling in the classroom, so the teacher had to calm everyone down.
A. participle
B. gerund
C. verb

5.
Swimming in the summer provides many people with an enjoyable activity.
A. participle
B. gerund
C. verb

6.
Seth could hear the marlin splashing in the waves.
A. participle
B. gerund
C. verb

7.
The mother and her child were seen strolling through the park.
A. participle
B. gerund
C. verb

8.
Running into the house and toward the back door, Jason bumped into his mom.
A. participle
B. gerund
C. verb

What is participle ???????

There are two: present and past.
The present participle can be confusing because it takes the same form of the gerund. The participle is either part of a verb or an adjective (modifying a noun), and the gerund is a noun. They both end in -ing. Examples:
He is swimming in the river. (Swimming is the present participle as part of the verb.)
The man swimming in the river saved the drowning child. (Here swimming is again the participle, but as an adjective modifying the noun "man.")
Swimming is great fun. (Here swimming is a gerund and is a noun, the subject of the sentence.)

The past participle ends in -ed. It also can either be part of the verb in the sentence or an adjective.
It can be part of the verb combined with a form of "to have" or as a passive voice sentence combined with "to be."
The dog was kicked by the donkey when it got too close. (Kicked is the participle in this passive voice sentence.)
The donkey has kicked a lot of dogs recently. (Again kicked is the participle in this present perfect sentence.)
The dog kicked by the donkey, but a chunk out of the donkey's leg. (Here kicked is the past participle used as an adjective describing the dog. )

What is a past participle (spanish)?

Past participle is just a way of making the passed tense of a verb with a helping word. In English an example would be " I have (helping word) spoken (past participle).

In Spanish

-For -ar verbs, drop the final -ar and add -ado. For example: hablar. Drop the - ar and ad -ado = hablado. E.g. Yo he hablado = I have spoken.

-For verbs that end in -er or -ir, drop those endings and add -ido, etc. comer - er + ido = comido, vivir - ir + ido = vivido

Then you have irregular past participles:

abrir (to open) - abierto (open)
cubrir (to cover) - cubierto (covered)
decir (to say) - dicho (said)

English grammar doesn’t describe things as a “participle tense.”In English, such as situation would be described in two parts:—The present perfect tense of any verb contain the auxiliary verb form of “to have” plus the past participle of the main verb.The past participle of a regular verb will be in the form of [verb] + “-ed”Examples are:— “have played,” “have arrived,” etc.

(Taught this stuff for 37 years at junior high school levels and college levels):1st person, present tense, singular: “I send.2nd person, present tense:, singular “You send.”3rd person, singular, present tense: “He/she/it sends” (*Note the 3rd person singular “s” inflection)PLURAL1st person, present tense, plural: “We send.”2nd person, present tense, plural: “You send.”3rd person, present tense, plural: “They send.”PRESENT PARTICIPLEI have sent; you have sent; he/she/it has sent (singular)We sent; you sent/ they sent.PAST PARTICIPLEI had sent, you had sent, he/she/it had sentWe had sent; you had sent; they had sentIn each case above, I have listed the 1st, 2nd and 3rd person singular and plural forms and, usually, when teaching this to junior high school students, I would draw a graph on the blackboard with the singular forms (I, you, he/she/it) on the left and the plural forms (we, you, they) on the right.Since I can’t draw a graph in that fashion on here, I have listed them (above) in both present, past, present participle and past participle tenses. You may notice that the most significant difference between the present participle and the past participle is that the “helper” word (have form) changes to past tense (“had”) as a helper in the past participle. Otherwise, it closely resembles the past tense, which is why I listed the simple past tense of the verb “to send” on this page.

"The present participle" is an incorrect name.It is clearly understood from what English grammar logic shows...e.g.We saw him coming over the little field opposite the house where he lived.saw – Active Simple Past (Past is used to show that the Sentence is Indicative mood, and saw (= formula) describes a Primary action (= predicate) in the Sentence)lived – Active Simple Past (Past is used to show that the Sentence is Indicative mood, and lived (= formula) describes a Primary action (= predicate) in the Sentence)COMING -- Active Simple Participle (Participle is used to show that coming (= formula) describes a Secondary action in the Sentence). BTW, can anyone see any “PRESENT” in this sentence?!!!Summing up, Present Participle or Active Participle (?) - it is up to you to decide which one seems more logical (= helpful in the process of learning).There are also two good neutral terms: Participle I and Participle II.If you are interested to know more, see Using the Logic of Natural English Grammar- ParticiplesIf you really want to UNDERSTAND the logic of NATURAL English Grammar and learn how it works, I suggest that you read What More Proof Is Needed? and more on Medium.

You just said it! Because the base word is come, the infinitive to come, and the past participle (as in has or have or had come) is come. By the way, the present participle is coming.Also note: what teachers may call past participle is also the perfect (not perfective!) and the passive… in contrast to the present, progressive, active participle coming.