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Why Are There So Many Twins In Greek Mythology

Are there any female twins in greek mythology?

Yes - the god Apollo and goddess Artemis are fraternal twins.

Also the famous Helen of Troy is a twin or rather a quadruplet contained within two sets of eggs. Zeus "visited" her mother Leda in the form of a swan and so the children of their union were birthed via 2 eggs.

Her sister is Clytemnestra who later married King Agamemnon of Mycenae. Her twin brothers were Castor and Pollux (also known as the Dioscuri, and sometimes spelled Kastor and Polydeuces).

Are there any male twins in Greek Mythology?

Many!

They occured a lot in Greek myths due to, well, a lot of things (it boils down to kings not wanting to be sacrificed, but all you need to know is by the time these myths were being written a lot of Greek countries had had a history of having a "two king" system - Sparta kept this two king system for yours, but then Castor and Polydeuces had been Spartan and were worshiped in Sparta)
So - twins where, generally, one was scared/demi-God and one was mortal:

The Dioscuri (Caster and Polydeuces). Sons of Zeus (sometimes just Polydeuces), worshipped as similar to Gods after their death http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Dioskouroi...

Idas and Lynceas (sometimes called the Aphareides) - Lynceas or both sometimes called sons of Posiden

Zetes and Calais, winged men, sons of Borous (the North Wind)
http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology...
They were part of the Argonauts, later killed by Heracules.

Heracules and Iphiculous (although it's very consistant that only Heracules was the son of Zeus, he did have a twin brother)

Your best bet of the above is the Dioscuri - the story is Castor, the mortal twin, was killed by one or the other of another pair of divine twins - Idas and Lynceas - Polydeuces prayed to Zeus to be dead with his brother. Zeus allowed them to share the dead - be alive one day and dead the next (the myths vary, in some thier just dead).
The point is, they were a popular cult, (what we would see as "patron saints" of Sparta, perhaps) - worshiped both as dead mortals/heroes, and offered sacrifices as Gods. There were reports of them manifesting at various points in greek history. The Romans were hugely keen on the Dioscuri, and once reported them leading them to victory at the Battle of Lake Regilus. They were so keen on them, in fact, it was one of the cults that kept going even after conversion to Christianity.
Heracules was also very popular, and became a diefied mortal (worshipped as a God), but his twin didn't.

Are there any girl twins in greek mythology?

Well, technically, Castor and Clytemnestra were twins and Pollux and Helen were twins that were born out of two eggs (Leda, the swan, some other guy...it was a little weird there.)

C & C were the mortal twins, and P & H were the immortal twins.

But I guess you could say that they were quadruplets since they were all born (laid?) at the same time.

Zeus as a swan...what a freak.

I don't think there were any female twins unless the ones above count.

Are there any girl twins in greek mythology?

Well, technically, Castor and Clytemnestra were twins and Pollux and Helen were twins that were born out of two eggs (Leda, the swan, some other guy...it was a little weird there.)

C & C were the mortal twins, and P & H were the immortal twins.

But I guess you could say that they were quadruplets since they were all born (laid?) at the same time.

Zeus as a swan...what a freak.

I don't think there were any female twins unless the ones above count.

What is the story of the birth of the twins in greek mythology?

The story is based on Leto, a daughter of the Titans Coues and Phoebe, whom the god Zeus fell in love with. To seduce Leto he changed her into a quail, and then himself into a quail, and they both met under a sunny field, where it was hard to see so then Hera, Zeus' jealous wife, couldn't find them.

But as you know, "the eyes of jealousy are very sharp", and Hera did see them. So she flung a curse to Leto saying, "Leto, you will grow heavy with child but you shall not bear in any land or island." So to enforce her curse, Hera sent the serpent Python to chase Leto out of any land she might try to bore her children. So Leto kept moving on and on, being chased away from every land until she finally came to the island of Delos, a cresent-shaped floating peace of sand with nothing but a palm tree in it. It was created by Poseidon just for fun in his early days, and it was not considered nor land nor island. Zeus also supported Leto by sending Notus, the South Wind, to blow Python away.

So Leto rested under the palm tree, but Hera did make things worse. She forbade her daughter, Eilythia, goddess of childbirth, to go to Leto. So Leto lied under the palm tree, feeling pain and aching with no result. But then she bribed hera by weaving a beautiful 9-foot scarf. Hera could not resist and instantly accepting it, she allowed Eilythia to help Leto by sending her down on a rainbow with the goddess Iris.

Then, on the Island of Delos, Leto gave birth to two twins: Artemis and Apollo.

And so the Island of Delos was blessed by being connected to land, and because it was the birthplace of the two twin gods, many pilgrims went to it and built temples in honor of Apollo, Artemis and Leto.

When does a religion turn into a mythology?

According to DS...the Bible becomes a myth, with the word 'in' O_o

In the past religion came mythology when nations changed their national religion and destroyed all the now non-believers and heretics...

Now, I think religion will never truly be destroyed, unless the government becomes a Global Totalitarianism one...

Why are the protogenoi from Greek mythology (Nyx, Erebus, Hypnos etc) often excluded from popular media like comics and movies? Many forms of media, especially DC comics and Marvel feature Gods and Titans but not the protogenoi.

Q: Why are the protogenoi from Greek mythology (Nyx, Erebus, Hypnos etc) often excluded from popular media like comics and movies?The protogonœ, or primordial gods in Greek mythology, had little to no role in Greek religion. They have never recieved worship and there are few mythical stories about them.In fact, the protogonœ in Hesiod’s Theogony are nothing but abstract concepts: Nyx is Night, Hēmera Day, Hypnos Sleep, Philotēs Love, Erōs Sex, &c. Yes, Eros is not son of Aphrodite.Most of the protogonœ have negative connotations: Erebos is Darkness, Thanatos Death, Mōmos Blame, Oizys Distress, Ædōs Shame, Eris Discord and others.Ancient Greeks themselves did not worship them as deities, but aknowledged their existance and some of them were regarded as ancestors of the gods.Very few myths existed about the protogonœ. According to the Iliad, Hypnos made Zeus fall asleep twice at Hera’s behest. Hera also celebrated Hypnos’s marriage with Pasithea.Given all of the above, it’s hard for a modern writer to include the protogonœ in their work, especially if trying to be coherent with the original Greek myths.

Did Sparta really exist or is it just a Greek myth?

It's absolutely historical, although most of what we read is written by non-Spartans.  You can still visit the ruins of Sparta in modern Greece -- though they're not very impressive.  As Thucydides said:Suppose the city of Sparta to be deserted, and nothing left but the temples and the ground-plan, distant ages would be very unwilling to believe that the power of the Lacedaemonians was at all equal to their fame. And yet they own two-fifths of the Peloponnesus, and are acknowledged leaders of the whole, as well as of numerous allies in the rest of Hellas. But their city is not built continuously, and has no splendid temples or other edifices; it rather resembles a group of villages like the ancient towns of Hellas, and would therefore make a poor show. Whereas, if the same fate befell the Athenians, the ruins of Athens would strike the eye, and we should infer their power to have been twice as great as it really is. Quora has lots of great Sparta related answers: Ancient Sparta

What mythological creature, besides a dragon, would you use in battle?

Breathes fireTaller than a mountainCapable of scorching and melting a significant portion of Earth’s surface, erasing rivers and seas from existenceStrong enough to rip up, carry, and throw entire mountainsIncredibly high speed and stamina (can cover thousands of miles by running or flying)Can survive being buried under entire landmassesHighly intelligent, being able to build barricades against attack (which incorporated entire mountains and went higher than the clouds)The mythological creature I am referring to here is Typhon, the most powerful monster from Greek mythology. I don’t think even a nuclear bomb could destroy this thing, not at least from sheer explosive power alone. According to many versions of the myth, Typhon survived getting pinned under a mountain, and in one version, the entire island of Ischia, which measures 6 miles across. Considering a nuclear explosion can not completely destroy a mountain (unless one buries a powerful nuke deep inside the peak and detonates it*)[1][2] , Typhon would probably shrug off a nuclear detonation without too much trouble.The effect of nuclear radiation on Typhon is unknown, but he and I would probably stick to battles with lots of people nearby to dissuade any opponents from using such drastic measures (the same goes for poison gas, though that would most likely just pool around his feet and have no effect on the monster unless it was dropped from above by plane.) Conventional weaponry would be all but useless.Typhon is godlike in terms of destructive capability. In battle, he would be extremely effective (but would cause lots of collateral damage.) He could pick up mountains to crush entire armies, or squash them with his colossal strength and incredible mass. He could cause tsunamis to overwhelm naval fleets, or incinerate vast swaths of the ocean with his fiery breath. Typhon, with his many heads and hands high in the sky, could spot and eliminate any aerial threats. Not to mention the terror and psychological threat a monster like Typhon would cause, striking fear in the hearts of allies and enemies both.*Good luck to anyone who tries to get a nuclear bomb inside the mouth(s) of, or anywhere close to, a fire-breathing, many-eyed monster.Footnotes[1] Mountains and Nuclear Bombs[2] Can a nuclear weapon destroy a mountain?